Artists & Makers
A Short History of Baker’s Twine
Posted June 4, 2013
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Bakers twine wasn’t always the colorful arts and crafts material we use today.

It’s history is actually quite simple: it’s called baker’s twine because its earlier use was for bakeries to tie paper wrapping around loaves of bread, cake boxes, and the like. Plain brown or white was probably the cheapest to have around rather than the colored ones.

Butchers actually have their own “twine” called butcher’s rayon (sometimes butcher’s string/twine), which is used to tie meat in preparation for cooking. This type of kitchen twine has no wax or color so it won’t affect the taste of the meat.

Fast forward to today, and you have twine bursting with colors, with uses that go well beyond just for tying. Although it has taken over the arts and crafts world, baker’s twine is still commonly used for wrapping with it’s simple attractiveness.

To celebrate this versatile material, this month’s postcard is about Baker Ben and his bread loaf wrapping magic. Look at him twirl that twine! Effortless.

All orders for the month of June will include a free Baker Ben postcard! Thank you once more to Paul for this wonderful illustration 🙂


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